Freewing New Style RC airplane

Freewing New Style RC airplane

Small FPV Drone to fly out big business

May 1, Shijiazhuang unmanned aircraft crossing machine Racing League Vanke Station competition, the players in the control of the crossing machine to play.

Photo by reporter Shanhui The contestants wear FPV (first angle) glasses, hand-held remote control, control the aircraft in the network track obstacles between the flexibility to travel through the audience at times to praise-this is the afternoon of May 1, the reporter in the “City Hot Practice” Shijiazhuang unmanned aircraft crossing machine Racing League Vanke station competition scene to see the wonderful scene.

From the province and Beijing, Tianjin and other land 19 players participated in the day of the Cross machine competition. The crossing machine originates from drones, but is smaller, faster and more flexible than drones. “The crossing machine cannot be used for aerial filming, and there is no autonomous flight control system. The race track is covered by the net, so it will not affect the airspace.

“As the” senior model fan “Hebei Ji Aviation Technology Co., Ltd. general manager Ray said, looks like” mini drone “of the cross machine, has become a lot of model aircraft enthusiasts, the relevant industry contains a lot of business opportunities. According to the introduction, the machine from the launch accelerated to 100 km/h only 3 seconds, the highest speed can reach 280 kilometers, so there is “air F1” said. Because it is exciting and full of suspense, the cross-country racing race has become an attractive sport in recent years.

There are about 350,000 enthusiasts in China who are active on social networks, and Beijing, Shanghai, Shenzhen and other countries have held cross-country racing races. It is reported that “the whole city Hot practice” Shijiazhuang unmanned aircraft crossing Machine Racing Tournament is our province’s first crossing machine competition. The league has a total of 6 races this year, and the organizers are also preparing to hold the finals. “Crossing machine is expected to become a new growth point of sports industry.” “The league organizers, Hebei province, the Horse Sports Technology Co., Ltd. general manager Li Weiguo said that the crossing machine tournament has a strong ornamental, he is optimistic about the movement of the machine in our province’s development potential.” “If you can successfully create a cross machine brand competition, you can carry out ticketing, advertising, copyright and derivatives and other market development, extend the industrial chain.”

” In addition, the Cross machine tournament has a strong driving force. According to the introduction, a assembled through the machine, the cost from hundreds of yuan to thousands of yuan, which does not include remote control, FPV glasses and other necessary supporting equipment. and cross machine beginners to grow to “master”, damage seven or eight of the crossing machine is common, wings and other vulnerable parts consumption more. At present, the domestic cross machine parts are mostly purchased from Zhejiang, Guangdong. “In fact, these spare parts in the provincial enterprises can also do.” “Ray said

So, how does the Freewing F-14 Tomcat fly? In short, pretty darn awesome! The distinguishable shape of the F-14 looks menacing in the air and the flight characteristics are fantastic. As discussed in my assembly review of the airplane, there are some tricks I’d highly recommend in setting the airplane up which at the end of the day, provide a great flying airplane. This comes from not just flying this particular airplane, but also flying the Freewing production prototype (stock and tailerons only) as well as the twin 70mm F-14 I helped design, test, and fly for my folks at JetHangar.com. They have all exhibited similar characteristics and fly very much the same.

In my assembly review, I covered the installation of two 6s 30C 5800 mah batteries that I’m using in the airplane. To maintain the CG, the battery area was modified so that the batteries could be pushed as far back as possible up against the swing wing carry through spar. This maintained the CG well per the manual (87mm measured back from the leading edge of the forward most hatch cut on the overwing fairing hatch) which has shown to be about perfect! Also the manual provides a trim elevator setting (31mm measured from the top of the fuselage to the leading edge of the tail) that is a very good
starting point for flight. Note that there is nothing to worry about regarding CG with wings extended vs wings swept. I found that the airplane could use just a touch more back pressure for flying around, but for me not enough to warrant adding any kind of mix. Also, the CG doesn’t change as a result of the change in wing position either. These have been the case with every F-14 Tomcat I’ve flown and are two of the most common questions I regularly get.

For the control throws, this is where it’s interesting. The control system on the full sized Tomcat uses the tails as the primary surfaces for commanding pitch and roll. The wing has spoilers to augment the roll control with the wings extended which are then disabled with the wings swept. Lastly, there are full span leading edge slats and trailing edge flaps. Now, in the case of the Freewing F-14 in the stock configuration it’s setup a bit differently than the full sized airplane. There are outboard wing ailerons and inboard wing flaps in addition to the taileron surfaces.

All of the servos in the airplane are routed into an electronics board which automatically sets the mixing between the outboard wing ailerons and the tailerons. That’s all well and good and works well for flying with the wings extended, however in this stock configuration the wing ailerons remain active while in the swept wing position and that causes problems. Disabling the ailerons in the wing swept position is absolutely necessary for a good flying model in the swept wing position. So, to get around this, we must program the two aileron servos separately by directly plugging them into the receiver (bypassing the electronics board) and programming their function independently (more discussion on this below). Note that the airplane flies well with the wings extended in the stock configuration, but I found the high rate aileron recommendations much too hot for my liking.

Since we’re programming the wing ailerons independently, I’m using the ailerons more as the function of the turning spoiler like the full size by having them act trailing edge up only to help augment the roll control provided by the tailerons when the wings are extended. Also, since we’re playing with the ailerons in this way, the scale geek in me figured why not set the airplane with full span flaps while we’re at it for a little more scale swag?! By doing this, I was pleasantly rewarded with a beautifully landing airplane that when executed right lands extremely softly! Lastly, having two rates on the tailerons between wings extended and wings swept is an absolute must! I mitigated that through some switch assignments such that the rates change automatically depending on where my wing sweep switch (and subsequently wing position) is. I talk through the radio programming methodology a bit more below. Note that based on the Freewing wing sweep actuators used, the airplane does not have a mid sweep capability, i.e. the wings can only be commanded to fully swept or fully extended.

So, after many flights, here’s what I have converged on for control throws. They suit my style of flying and should be a good starting point to tune to your desired feel. Keep in mind these are purely linear with NO exponential (I’m not a big fan of expo typically). Also, there is plenty of authority running tailerons only, I’ve flown the airplane in that configuration and it works very well. However, the roll stick input requires just about max deflection for a decent 360 degree roll.

Wings Extended:
Roll – tailerons 1-1/4″, wing ailerons mixed with 3/16″ trailing edge up only
Pitch – elevator 1-1/4″
Full span flaps
Partial Flap – 5/8″ with a 3/16″ up elevator mix
Full Flap – 2″ with a 1/2″ up elevator mix

Wings Swept:
Roll – tailerons 1/2″ (no wing aileron throw)
Pitch – elevator 1-1/4″

DOWNLOAD THE SPEKTRUM DX FILE HERE!

f14-dual-2

RADIO PROGRAMMING METHODOLOGY
My go to radio system is the Airtronics SD-10G which is an excellent radio at an excellent price. It’s a 10 channel radio with a ton of capability which made programming the F-14 Tomcat fairly easy. Since radio systems vary, I figure it best to talk through the methodology I used here which should work across most systems I would hope. In order to do what I’ve done exactly, a minimum of 9 channels are required so that the ailerons can be programed individually to function with the flaps as well as act like a turning spoiler. If limited on channels, then it limits the functionality of the ailerons to work only as ailerons (2 servos connected with a y-harness) or as flaps (flying airplane tailerons only and connecting the aileron servos through a y-harness with a reverser on one side). I’ve flown the airplane tailerons only and it flies very well, so if channel limited and you want the full span flap, that is a very good option. That said, I do like the addition of the outboard aileron functionality as it adds a little more roll responsiveness with the wings extended that you don’t get flying with tailerons only.

So, utilizing the 9 channel setup (I have a 10 channel receiver in the airplane) the aileron servos were plugged directly into the receiver using 2 available auxillary channels (bypassing the stock electronics board, all other channels are plugged in and remain in the stock setup). This maintains everything essentially stock with the exception of the aileron servos only.

Ailerons as Flaps
f14-flapI first setup the ailerons to work in conjunction with the flaps. This was done by assigning the two aileron channels to the flap switch and simply adjusting the servo direction and the servo position (using the end point adjustments) at each switch position to match the flaps in each down position.

Ailerons as Turning Spoilers
f14-ailTo actuate the ailerons as a turning spoiler, I used two separate channel mixes, one for each aileron servo aux channel), that were mixed to the standard aileron channel. This channel mix was then assigned to my swing wing switch such that the channel mix is active with the wings extended and then inactive when switched to the wings swept position (disables the ailerons in the swept wing config). Within the channel mix is where the deflections of the aileron servos are set and adjusted. Since I’m using them acting trailing edge up only, it required only adjusting a single end point for each mix/servo (approximately 25%). Again, this is within the channel mix only. Note that since this is outside the traditional aileron setup and aileron channel, these channel mixes do not work in combination with the traditional aileron dual rates. However, some creative switch assignments and an additional channel mix or two could probably create this. I didn’t find this necessary since I only wanted the ailerons active with the wings extended and tuned the rates to the desired feel I wanted with my tailerons on high rate.

Taileron Rates with Wing Position
In addition to the above, I assigned my aileron dual rates to the swing wing switch (in addition to the normal dual rates switch) so that with the wings swept, the tailerons automatically reduce to low rates. This is important as the airplane will otherwise be extremely touchy in roll with the wings swept if the tailerons remain at high rate. The airplane will be on its back if you simply breath on the stick!

ESC Calibration
The last item of business before flight is to calibrate the speed controllers to the transmitter (procedure is available here). By following the procedure, the ESCs will tune themselves to the transmitter settings and ensures that each fan is producing the maximum amount of thrust each time it’s powered on. If you change the transmitter at anytime, then the ESCs should be recalibrated. I didn’t do this calibration on the production prototype but did on this airplane and this airplane has notably better performance! So, this is an important step!

One thing to note, I noticed some thrust robbing openings in the exhausts around the taileron servo cutouts and where the motor wires exit into the fuselage. I sealed these up by removing the fan hatches and adding some packing tape f14-sealsinternally over the taileron servo and using hot glue to seal up around the motor wire exit. After placing the fan hatches back onto the fuselage, I used a long dowel to completely seal the packing tape over the hatch areas too. Any leaks in the exhaust ultimately reduce thrust and performance. Though it may be small, every little bit helps for maximum efficiency of the system.

 

 

FLYING THE FREEWING F-14 TOMCAT
Flying the F-14 Tomcat is an absolute blast and with the 5800 mah packs, I can get about 5 minutes of pretty hard flying if I want to push it. Currently, I keep the timer at 4 minutes and fly the airplane as hard as I like and the packs measure out at about 3.78v/cell. Every F-14 I’ve flown has been a great flyer and the Freewing F-14 is no exception. The F-14 configuration as a whole is just a great platform for an awesome flying airplane. Plus, you can’t beat the shape of the F-14 in the air. It’s one of those iconic airplanes that is unmistakable…though it always seems to conjure up quotes from the movie “Top Gun” whether you want them or not…”No my ego doesn’t write checks…I have an ATM card!” 😉

Here’s a full flight video from a fun flying day at the PVMAC Prado Air Park. Thanks Brent Hecht for manning the camera for this flight.

With the wings extended, the airplane is a wonderful flying machine that flies easily and will handle most of what you throw at it (rudders are very effective though, so be aware). The airplane is plenty fast enough and the vertical is quite good. To give you an example, I’m able to perform a 1/2 cuban 8 return from takeoff just like the full size which is a great deal of fun! Recently I’ve gotten into performing a roll on takeoff followed by a 1/2 cuban 8 return and the airplane handles it like a champ! The slow speed handling is excellent as well and the airplane will visually give you an indication of the onset of stall. As you get slow, the wings will start to rock as you approach the stall speed which is your indication to apply power and increase the speed. This is another characteristic of all F-14s I’ve flown. Note that this is less prevalent when slow and with full span flaps.

f14-flt-1

 

 

 

The airplane flies just as easily with the wings swept too. Flying circuit after circuit in the swept wing configuration is easy with low rate taileron and the airplane carries speed well overall in that configuration. Pulling hard tight turns does bleed the speed off in this configuration, which is a characteristic of a delta type platform so keep that in mind.

 

 

Overall, the trickiest part I have found is managing the transition time from wings extended to wings swept and visa versa. Once you’re aware of it though, it’s easy enough to plan for. As noted in the radio setup, the tailerons are automatically set to switch to high and low rates during wing transition. However, this does not occur proportionally to the speed of the wing transition (I wasn’t sure I could program this into the radio). As a result upon hitting the swing wing switch, the wings transition over a second or two, but the taileron rates immediately change. So, when the wings sweep back, the taileron rate will initially start out sluggish (they switch to low rate) and become increasingly more effect as the wings transition aft. Conversely, when sweeping forward, the taileron rates are immediately high and touchy and then become less sensitive as the wings transition forward. It’s really not a big deal, but is something to keep in mind. You’ll quickly become aware of it when you experience a quick roll response as the wings sweep forward. It’s easily manageable…in fact, my favorite maneuver has become rolling while the wings transition like they used to do as part of their airshow demos.

Call the Ball!
At last, the world can rest easily as there is a nicely done F-14 Tomcat ARF that is affordable for most folks. The $580 price tag is an excellent value and you get a well engineered and great flying model. It’s foam which has it’s limitations (if you’re a builder, my folks have a kit at JetHangar.com), but even so it’s pretty nice. I can’t help but think how awesome this airplane would be after stripping it down and refinishing it…but for now, we’ll keep it stock. Now guys, remember, as these become more prevalent and more Freewing F-14 flight videos come online, remember to post responsibly…the internet really doesn’t need another RC jet video featuring the “Top Gun Anthem” or “Danger Zone” playing underneath it…it’s hard to believe, I know! Although, if you’re up for a challenge, how about a few videos featuring “Take my Breath Away” or “Heaven in Your Eyes.” 😉 I mean, they are from the Top Gun soundtrack afterall!

Here are a few more videos I’ve captured of some friends flying their Freewing Tomcats. It really is a very cool foam jet and we’ve been having a lot of fun with them!

 

 

BONUS! Here’s video of the last F-14 Tomcat demo at NAS Oceana in case you’re looking for some maneuvers. 🙂 Who doesn’t love the Tomcat?! I remember the Tomcat demos being one of my favorites when I was a kid at air shows. The full size airplane was an absolute beast!

Written by Tina
Take your foam jet experience to the next level
Product review
Photos by Tina,China Freewing manufacruewe

 

 

Specifications
• Model type: EDF jet
• Skill level: Intermediate to advanced
• Wingspan: 44.8 inches
• Wing area: 512 square inches
• Length: 56 inches
• Weight: 129 ounces
• Power system: 90mm electric ducted fan
• Radio: Minimum seven-channel radio/receiver
• Construction: EPO foam
• Street price: $499

 

Test-model details
• Motor used: Freewing 3748-1550 Kv brushless outrunner (installed)
• Speed controller: Freewing 130-amp brushless with separate 8-amp BEC (installed)
• Battery: Admiral 6S 22.2-volt 5,000 mAh 50C LiPo with EC5 connector
• EDF: Freewing 90mm with 12-blade impeller (installed)
• Radio system: Spektrum Black Edition DX9 DSMX 2.4 GHz transmitter; Spektrum AR8000 DSMX receiver
• Ready-to-fly weight: 129 ounces
• Flight duration: 3 to 4 minutes

 

Pluses
• Extremely high level of scale detail.
• High blade count impeller produces excellent thrust, with accompanying realistic-sounding and ear-pleasing acoustics.
• CNC aluminum suspension-equipped struts and sequenced, multipanel gear doors.
• Operational speed brakes and LE slats.
• Multipin wing connectors and wiring interface module help to tame the abundance of wiring.

 

Minus
• Relatively short flight duration.

 

Product review
Pilots who love flying foam-composition scale jets have, in the past, been forced to make a few obligatory concessions. Until recently, most mass-produced jet models typically featured a meager level of scale detail. Additionally, the electric ducted-fan (EDF) power systems included with many of the kits of yore were underpowered, out of balance, and obnoxiously noisy.

Pilots who preferred any higher level of scale detail and/or a more powerful, better-sounding EDF power system were forced to spend countless hours engineering and improving their jet models. Although that process might be the best part of the hobby to a select few, most prospective EDF jet fliers probably prefer that a model come out of the box already equipped with an impressive level of scale detail and a smooth, appropriately powerful EDF power system preinstalled. Motion RC recently released a series of Freewing Super Scale 90mm EDF jets that are sure to please EDF-loving pilots interested in a scale jet model.

The first kit to be released in the series was the popular T-45 Goshawk. The McDonnell Douglas T-45 Goshawk made its first flight in 1988. This carrier-capable aircraft has since been used extensively by the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps as a jet flight trainer.

There have been more than a few T-45 kits available to modelers throughout the last few years, most of them done up in the trademark U.S. Navy International orange and white color scheme. Model pilots prone to protest the arrival of “yet another orange and white USN Goshawk” were stopped midsentence by the impressive list of features included with this 90mm EPO foam-composition EDF jet.

 

 

Freewing’s 90mm EDF-powered version of the U.S. Navy-themed T-45 Goshawk is stunningly detailed.

 

The T-45 is available in Plug and Play (PNP) and ARF Plus variants. The former includes all electronic components, while the latter omits the EDF unit and speed controller. The ARF Plus kit is perfect for pilots who prefer to source their own power system. The availability of this option does not infer that the 90mm EDF that Freewing installs in the PNP version is in any way a lackluster performer. To the contrary, this high-performance 90mm EDF uses a 12-blade impeller and endows the T-45 with plenty of thrust!

The long list of scale-enhancing features included with this exquisitely detailed jet is guaranteed to fog the face masks of even the most jaded jet pilots. This model uses worm-gear-driven leading edge (LE) slats. To my knowledge, it is the first time that this unique and fully functional feature has ever been included on a mass-produced model!

Sequenced, multipanel gear doors and trailing link suspension-equipped electric landing gear nicely replicate the geometry and functionality of the full-scale Goshawk’s tricycle landing gear. Rows of plastic vortex generators are positioned slightly aft of the wing’s LEs. Other cool plastic details include a tailhook, functional speed brakes, a pitot tube, and antennae.

A removable cockpit and hatch includes a pair of pilot figures and a nicely detailed cockpit interior. The clear plastic canopy even mimics the explosive cord used to predetonate the full-scale T-45’s canopy milliseconds before the pilots’ ejection seats will fire.

A full array of strobing and fixed navigation lights comes preinstalled, as does a small wiring interface module that helps to manage the abundance of wiring used on this full-featured model.

Finally, Freewing did not simply add a few details to the wings and white stabilizers and call it a U.S. Navy scheme. The impressive number and variety of factory-applied maintenance graphics and U.S. Navy markings adorning every inch of this big Goshawk jet help it live up to its Super Scale moniker!

 

Assembly
The PNP version of the T-45 comes out of the box in such an advanced state of completion that there is no need to spend hours at one’s workbench assembling and prepping this detailed jet for its first flights. Pilots pulling the parts out of the box for the first time can instead use the time to savor the incredible variety of included scale details!

 

 

The only items that pilots will need to source to get this quick-assembling PNP kit in the air are a seven- to nine-channel receiver and a 6S 50C 5,000 mAh LiPo battery.

 

An abundance of plastic bits are used to enhance the scale outline of the Goshawk. Notable pieces include a striped tailhook and detailed cockpit with twin pilot figures. The cockpit instrumentation even includes a simulated lighted heads-up display!

Freewing supplements the air supplied to the preinstalled 90mm EDF power system through the scale twin inlet ducts with a large auxiliary air inlet opening, located on the bottom of the fuselage just forward of the fan assembly. A large, rectangular, plastic, louvered inlet panel helps to prohibit the entry of potentially damaging foreign objects and debris.

Best practices when assembling a PNP configuration kit include taking a little time to inspect the integrity of all of the control surface hinges and pushrod connections. Freewing’s use of ball-link-style connectors on the control surface side of the pushrods comes with the advantage of minimal backlash. This can help a model respond more crisply to control inputs and track more precisely in the air and on the ground.

Actual assembly of the airframe involves mounting the horizontal and vertical stabilizer assemblies and two-piece wing. Removable fasteners allow pilots to easily break the model down for transport or replace damaged components when necessary. A little adhesive is required to mount the two different tail cone pieces and to attach the nose cone-mounted pitot tube.

The entire nose cone assembly itself is conveniently engineered to be easily removable and is held in place using magnets. This helps prevent damage to the somewhat delicate component by popping it off for transport and storage. The two wing halves utilize multipin connectors. These conveniently aggregate all of the electronics used in each wing half onto one larger connector. This simplifies wing attachment and removal, and reduces the chances of making wrong connections when assembling the model at the field.

Pilots who want to have independent control of all of the T-45’s features will need to source a minimum eight-channel receiver. A seven-channel receiver can alternately be pressed into service, although this option will require that the slats and flaps are connected to, and driven by, the same channel.

As a longtime Spektrum radio system user, the form factor and number of channels offered by the Spektrum AR8000 DSMX eight-channel receiver made it the obvious choice for this high-performance jet. This full-range receiver’s use of a satellite receiver, which brings the added benefit of multipath redundancy, gives pilots an extra level of confidence. The length of the satellite receiver’s pigtail allowed it to be located forward of the main receiver, near the nose gear retract mechanism.

The black and white assembly manual offers in-depth assembly and component replacement instructions. It includes a complete listing of the 14 servos preinstalled in the airframe, as well as their rotation and the lengths of their leads.

A detailed printout and mapping of the included E04 wiring module assists pilots with the connection of all of the various lights and servo leads. The manual also recommends high- and low-rate throws, the proper center of gravity (CG) location, and that pilots configure the elevator’s neutral position to be slightly biased toward the down position.

 

 

This full-featured T-45 includes an abundance of radio connections and wiring; Freewing’s use of the E04 Integrated Circuit Module helps keep it all as neat as possible.

 

Although the recommended six-cell 22.2-volt 5,000 mAh LiPo battery fits snugly into the battery bay, enough room exists to move it forward and aft for the optimum CG. Those who prefer to source their own high-performance 8S or even 10S EDF power system will want to opt for the ARF Plus version of this kit. The sole difference is that this kit omits the stock Freewing 90mm power system. All other electronics come included and preinstalled exactly as they do in the PNP version.

 

Flying
The importance of performing a thorough preflight routine is imperative. This helps to minimize any in-flight surprises—something most pilots prefer to avoid when flying a larger, high-performance EDF jet model such as the T-45.
Positioning the big Admiral six-cell 5,000 mAh LiPo battery so that its forward edge is even with the Goshawk’s twin intakes balances the airframe within a few millimeters of the recommended CG. The assembly manual recommended a takeoff configuration of half flaps to allow the T-45 to rotate sooner than when takeoffs are performed without the flaps deployed. Whatever takeoff flap configuration a pilot elects to use, the airframe needs time to accelerate to a proper rotation speed.

Although the thrust produced by the Freewing 90mm EDF motivates this 8-pound jet hastily forward, the sound produced by the 12-blade impeller at full throttle is a guaranteed grin generator!

The aluminum trailing link tricycle landing gear nicely absorbs aberrations in the runway surface and helps to keep this jet tracking nicely in the takeoff roll. Only minimal rudder corrections are typically required.

Scale EDF jets fly best when operated in a scalelike manner. The higher wing loading of this airframe precludes pilots yanking and banking it around in the same manner that they would a lightly loaded sport jet. The throttle should generally be kept above 50% at all times and turns should be kept on the gradual side; however, these statements are not intended to infer that this model is difficult to fly.

Keep the speed up and the transmitter inputs controlled and deliberate and the Freewing T-45 will happily cruise around the sky without any bad behavior. High-rate control authority gives a pilot the ability to loop and roll this T-45 with only modest amounts of stick movement required.

The extreme level of out-of-the-box scale detailing, combined with the incredibly smooth, turbine-like sound of the Freewing 90mm EDF power system, give this jet an in-flight appearance and presence that surpasses any EDF model I have experienced!

 

 

Freewing’s 12-blade 90mm EDF power system make this jet sound as good as it looks.

 

The impressive performance offered by this 90mm EDF jet comes with one caveat: typical flight durations using the stock Freewing six-cell 90mm EDF power system will be in the range of three to four minutes.

Although many pilots use a countdown timer to alert them to the need to land, this model is the perfect candidate for the use of a radio telemetry system. Receiving real-time feedback about the voltage of the flight battery enables a pilot to maximize the flight durations of this high-performance model and minimize any chance of accidentally flying this jet into a low-voltage cutoff condition.

Most pilots will agree that the landing is what separates the men from the boys. Freewing’s use of LE and speed brakes on the Goshawk give pilots additional resources that can help bring this big jet safely home every time.

The best landing approaches will occur if pilots give this model a little time to adjust to each applied change in configuration. Quickly and simultaneously dumping flaps, gear, slats and speed brakes can potentially upset the airframe and get a pilot into trouble.

Performing a controlled and traditional rectangular landing approach, with nice extended legs and gradual, arcing transitions through the corners, is a recipe for the perfect, scalelike landing. Well-planned deployment of each individual piece of the airframe should be a pilot’s goal when shooting an approach.

An upwind pass directly over the runway centerline is a great way to visually verify that a pilot has all three landing gear down. The first notch of flaps can be deployed with the jet turning crosswind to downwind. Using a transmitter’s flap speed setting to substantially slow the movement of the flaps allows the jet to settle into the new configuration with minimal pitch changes. Full flaps and slats can be deployed on either the crosswind leg or the base leg.

As the airframe gets “dirty,” pilots will need to actively modulate the throttle to maintain airspeed. Fly the T-45 all the way into the numbers and it can execute the prettiest, nose-high landing approach imaginable!

 

 

The suspension-equipped aluminum trailing link landing gear helps the Goshawk “stick” to the runway when landing.

 

Pilot preference will dictate whether the speed brakes are deployed on final approach or during the landing rollout. The sight of this superbly scalelike model on final, with its nose gear mounted and super bright landing light ablaze, will send a shiver of excitement down the spine of pilots and onlookers alike.

 

Conclusion
With the availability of this amazingly detailed EPO foam-composition jet, pilots can now buy a turnkey, scale, high-performance military jet at a price point that most hardcore EDF enthusiasts will find perfectly palatable. The included six-cell Freewing 90mm EDF power system amply powers the T-45 to roughly 80 to 85 mph and produces smooth, somewhat turbinelike acoustics that are sure to be a sweet-sounding symphony to the ears of EDF enthusiasts.

Pilots who like to go fast know that speed costs money. Or, in the case of this model, speed comes at the expense of amp draw.

With shorter-than-normal flight durations, which is the sole caveat of this exquisitely detailed PNP kit, pilots who crave a large, highly detailed, and superbly performing scale military jet will assuredly love the way this model looks, sounds, and performs in the air!

The time has come! Developed in tandem alongside last summer’s Project Virtue (80mm A-4 Skyhawk), Project Bond was our codename for Freewing’s first F-4 Phantom. With the 64mm and 80mm series stocked with recent aircraft from the Vietnam era, we set out to bring it all home with a big 90mm F-4. We know many of us have been waiting for the venerable Rhino to get the proper Motion RC treatment, and we know you’ll enjoy flying the final result!

OVERVIEW
Aviation enthusiasts have long loved the F-4 Phantom, and Freewing and Motion RC are extremely proud to introduce our 90mm Super Scale Series rendition of this ultimate warfighter! For more than 50 years, the F-4 Phantom delivered the versatile capabilities required of an all-weather frontline supersonic interceptor, fighter-bomber, SEAD, and reconnaissance platform. Less than a year after its retirement from US military service, keep the F-4 Phantom flying in your RC fleet!

DESIGN
RC fans have consistently requested a large F-4 in true PNP format that performs excellently out of the box without endless modifications. We developed this F-4 to deliver reliability, durability, and performance from your very first flight, supported by Freewing’s parts availability and Motion RC’s customer service should you ever need it. We can also confidently state that dependable grass operation is a hallmark of the Freewing 90mm F-4. With its wide stance, tall main tires, Oleo suspension nose strut and concealed trailing link suspension main struts, this aircraft performs well on rougher grass fields normally reserved for the Freewing A-10, Avanti, and other reliable “grass approved” EDFs. Failsafes were also designed into the mounting arrangement to minimize structural foam damage in the event of excessively rough landings beyond normal limits.

DETAILS
The Freewing 90mm F-4’s Super Scale details include accurate dual landing lights flush-mounted into the scale operating nose wheel doors, DayBright position lights, rivet detail, eight factory-painted colors, static arrestor hook, and period accurate ordnance comprising four AIM-9D Sidewinders and two 600 gallon fuel tanks. Copious detail is molded into the aircraft’s surfaces without distracting from the overall scale effect, including recessed areas depicting Position 4 and 6 (where DIY modelers could add belly-mounted AIM-7D/E Sparrows). Plastic details include pitot tubes, ejection seat pull rings, and molded exhaust nozzles. The large fiberglass nose cone is magnetic and removable, and the chin pod beneath it is foam, allowing easy removable and customization for other versions (-C or late -D or other). An optional, highly detailed 3DPUP set (“3D Printed Upgrade Part”) is available that represents the correct Mk H-7 ejection seats and cockpit instrument panels in high detail.

LIVERY
Representing the famed aircraft BuNos 66-463 operated by pilot Richard “Steve” Ritchie and weapons systems officer Charles “Chuck” DeBellevue when they scored their fifth kill together on May 10, 1972 over Vietnam, the Freewing 90mm F-4 arrives pre-painted in classic SEA (South East Asia) Camo and proudly wears the markings of the 555th TFS. BuNos 66-463 became a bona fide “MiG Killer”, being credited for six aerial kills with five different flight crews. The primary colors of the Freewing F-4 were based on color samples from a real F-4, obtained in person with our museum partner and then scaled appropriately for the model. For piloting wanting to customize their F-4 with their own scheme, we recommend Callie-Graphics.com for all your custom adhesive vinyl decal needs, and we worked with her to ensure her decal sets match our Freewing 90mm F-4’s proportions.

PAINT
For customers wanting to touch up the paint of the factory paint job, or are customizing their aircraft with weathering or modifications like opening canopies, for color references, I used a brand called “MiG by Ammo”. Credit to my good friend Levendis for his recommendation. The “MiG by Ammo” paints were surprisingly extremely accurate when put up against the real F-4 at the museum we used as a color reference (hands on, in person, I did it myself to ensure accuracy). The four colors are available here as part of a set. One set is enough to add the differential shading to the stock PNP colors, if you find that you want to simulate the paint fading I recommended about. Painting the entire model would require more paint, but again, as a top coat of shading, the set linked below is more than enough, and the point is for the paints not to be 100% exact, but 90%-ish to show a difference in age. I really like these MiG by Ammo paints. They’re water wash up acrylics, like Tamiya. Odorless, very easy to use, and easy to shoot at 15-20psi with a 4:1 paint to thinner ratio, depending on distance from target and desired line thickness/attributes.

EASE OF USE
Such a large RC model aircraft remains easy to transport with its magnetic removable fiberglass nose cone and removable wings with a convenient flexible wire harness that attaches at each wing root. Large flaps, brass ball links, reliable control hardware, and digital servos throughout the aircraft provide dependable control, and a specially designed elevator mechanism incorporates two ball bearings for smooth rotation at all times. The primary assembly of the entire aircraft requires only one epoxy joint.

POWER SYSTEM
The Freewing 90mm F-4 Phantom II is available in two power system versions. The Standard version requires a 6s 5000-6000mAh battery, and is our top recommendation to pilots seeking the best balance between speed, thrust, and cost. The High Performance version requires an 8s 5000mAh battery, and delivers increased vertical climbing performance and acceleration. The High Performance version is recommended for Advanced pilots only due to the aircraft’s higher speed envelope and heavier flying characteristics.

FLIGHT CHARACTERISTICS
Recognizing that much of the F-4’s brute speed was a function of its powerful engines rather than a slippery aerodynamic profile, we incorporated several key design elements specific to the scaled down model to achieve the intended flight characteristics. The result is a suprisingly nimble and agile Phantom that penetrates well, lands slowly, and has excellent vertical performance.

After years of waiting, the time has come! Own the biggest and best performing foam EDF F-4 Phantom in the world. Freewing has delivered another grand slam!

he 3DPUP set for the F-4, available factory-printed as an Upgrade Set, comprises 15 different pieces that assemble to create a nearly full cockpit tub for both pilot and WSO, and also two crew ladders. Say goodbye to alligator skin on the dashboard! The crew ladders also make a nice touch for static display, and are intended to tempt certain industrious modelers (you know who you are) to execute an opening canopy mod. We purposely left space in the seat pillars to fit 9g servos…